CMSC 451 Dijkstras Single Source Shortest Path Problem Discussion

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CMSC 451 Project 2
Project 2 involves writing an analysis of the results that you obtained in first project. You are to
submit a paper that discusses the results of your analysis. Your paper should include the
following items:



A brief introduction of the sorting algorithm that you have selected and how the two
versions of the algorithm compare including:
o High-level pseudocode for the sorting algorithms
o A Big-Θ analysis of the two versions of the algorithm
o An explanation of your approach to avoiding the problems associated with JVM
warm-up
o A discussion of the critical operation that you chose to count with an explanation
of why you selected it
An analysis of the results of your study, which should include:
o graph of critical operations for both algorithms and one for the execution times
o a comparison of the performance of the two versions of the algorithm
o a comparison of the critical operation results and the actual execution time
measurements
o a discussion of the significance of the coefficient of variance results and how it
reflects the data sensitivity of your algorithm
o how your results compare to your Big-Θ analysis
A conclusion that summarizes the important observations of your study
If for any reason, it was necessary to revise the program you submitted in project 1, the revised
source code should also be included along with the paper.
Grading Rubric
Criteria
Introduction
Meets
100 points
Does Not Meet
0 points
35 points
0 points
Contains a brief description of the
sorting algorithm together with highlevel pseudocode for the algorithm
(10)
Does not contain a brief description of
the sorting algorithm together with
high-level pseudocode for the
algorithm (0)
Contains a correct Big-Θ analysis of
the algorithm (10)
Does not contain a correct Big-Θ
analysis of the algorithm (0)
Contains an explanation of your
approach to avoiding the problems
associated with JVM warm-up (10)
Does not contain an explanation of
your approach to avoiding the
problems associated with JVM warmup (0)
Analysis
Conclusion
Contains a discussion of the critical
operation that you chose to count
with an explanation of why you
selected it (5)
Does not contain a discussion of the
critical operation that you chose to
count with an explanation of why you
selected it (0)
50 points
0 points
Contains a graph of critical
operations and one for the execution
times (20)
Does not contain a graph of critical
operations and one for the execution
times (10)
Contains a comparison of the
performance of the two versions of
the algorithm (5)
Does not contain a comparison of the
performance of the two versions of the
algorithm (0)
Contains a comparison of the critical
operation results and the actual
execution time measurements (10)
Does not contain a comparison of the
critical operation results and the actual
execution time measurements (0)
Contains a discussion of the
significance of the coefficient of
variation results and how it reflects
the data sensitivity of your algorithm
(5)
Contains a discussion of how your
results compare to your Big-Θ
analysis (10)
Does not contain a discussion of the
significance of the coefficient of
variation results and how it reflects the
data sensitivity of your algorithm (0)
15 points
0 points
Contains a conclusion that
summarizes the important
observations of your study (20)
Does not contain a discussion of how
your results compare to your Big-Θ
analysis (0)
Does not contain a conclusion that
summarizes the important
observations of your study (0)
The traveling salesperson problem is a harder problem than Dijkstra’s
single-source shortest path problem. In other words, the typical Greedy
algorithm approach does not work for this problem. It is even harder
than the all-points shortest path algorithm implemented with Floyd’s
algorithm. Give an example of a graph that shows that the path that
would be chosen by relying on shortest-path information by choosing
the closest vertex each time isn’t sufficient to find the shortest circuit.
What makes this problem harder? Why are the straight forward
approaches to this problem exponential?

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